Winners without Losers: Why Americans Should Care More about Global Economic Policy (A Council on Foreign Relations Book)-Edward J. Lincoln

  • Title: Winners without Losers: Why Americans Should Care More about Global Economic Policy (A Council on Foreign Relations Book)
  • Author: Edward J. Lincoln
  • Released: 2007-09-28
  • Language:
  • Pages: 280
  • ISBN: 0801446228
  • ISBN13: 978-0801446221
  • ASIN: 0801446228

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Review "I hope that this book will be widely read by policymakers and opinion leaders, as well as by academics and students. Its central message could hardly be more important. Edward Lincoln convincingly argues that 'we are currently in danger of making our world less safe by ignoring or downplaying economic issues.'. . . What Linclon has served up is clear thinking, not a batch of free market ideology. ONe need not agree with all of his policy recommendations to benefit greatly from his analysis." Thomas D. Willett, Political Science Quarterly

"Winners without Losers speaks to a broad audience, and conveys a truth that ought to be self-evident: that sixty years of positive economic change have made our planet a fundamentally different and less dangerous place. Economic growth and interdependence have made war unthinkable among the very advanced industrial nations that were mired in conflict early in the twentieth century. This is very important. It is also, as Edward J. Lincoln notes, a truth neglected or under-recognized by our national leaders and by many scholars of international relations. In telling that story and addressing its implications, Lincoln writes with clarity and purpose."—I. M. Destler, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

From the Back Cover "Winners without Losers speaks to a broad audience, and conveys a truth that ought to be self-evident: that sixty years of positive economic change have made our planet a fundamentally different and less dangerous place. Economic growth and interdependence have made war unthinkable among the very advanced industrial nations that were mired in conflict early in the twentieth century. This is very important. It is also, as Edward J. Lincoln notes, a truth neglected or under-recognized by our national leaders and by many scholars of international relations. In telling that story and addressing its implications, Lincoln writes with clarity and purpose."--I. M. Destler, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland pdf